Blacksmiths in Metchosin

I had the pleasure of attending the Contemporary Blacksmith’s¬†forge-in last week. The group of Pacific Northwest Blacksmiths were collaborating on a sculpture for Pearson International Airport in Toronto.

Watching the process of taking raw metal to finished product was quite something. The Smiths themselves were all very capable craftspeople.

Below are some photos from the event.

They're not making horse shoes, here. Bart Turner shapes the bottom of the Rogers Arena for a sculture of the Toronto skyline, while a shaped sun lies on the work table.

In the olden days, Smiths would employ juniors to hammer away and soften the metal, using a sledgehammer and an anvil. Now, a power hammer is used. Here, Jake James and Bart Turner are featured.

In the olden days, Smiths would employ juniors to hammer away and soften the metal, using a sledgehammer and an anvil. Now, a power hammer is used. Here, Jake James and Bart Turner are featured.

One of the many fires the Smiths had going.

One of the many fires the Smiths had going. Some were coal, others propane.

Over the course of about a half hour, this piece of rectangular metal was bashed, heated and shaped into a fine point.

Over the course of about a half hour, this piece of rectangular metal was bashed, heated and shaped into a fine point.

blacksmith sparks contemporary pacific northwest

When the sparks fly, there’s something wrong — but it does make for great pictures.

Sannich and Lifecycles launch local food growing program

Saanich has partnered with Lifecycles Project Society to offer a discount on Lifecycles’ educational workshops to teach Saanich residents to grow kitchen gardens. Those who register for the program through the Saanich website also receive 50% off Lifecycles food growing courses, and qualify for monthly prize draws.

For more information, visit the Saanich website here.